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  1. […] so they relieve the surging of the blood around the heart, but occasionally, as when a man falsely accuses another of drinking imported beer, he is clearly intending ironically to point out the excellences […]

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  2. David
    October 25, 2016

    I’ve just read the SSPX’s “Catholic Principles for Voting,” and my takeaway is that, although it could never be morally obligatory, it is at least permissible to vote for Trump as the lesser evil. I don’t think he really cares about abortion, but I don’t think that he would act to expand it as Hillary would. It’s that old dilemma of being confronted with one candidate who doesn’t care about the Church and one candidate who positively hates her.

    I could never fault a Catholic who opted not to vote for Trump: voting for the lesser evil is still voting for evil, and that can’t ever be obligatory. But, do you think that there is a moral obligation not to vote for Trump?

    I’m quite torn about this. In particular, I have in mind those times when Judah was tempted to make alliances with her neighbors rather than trust in the Lord. It didn’t work out well. But does that mean we should abstain from voting altogether until the perfect candidate comes along?

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    1. Dale
      October 25, 2016

      “It’s that old dilemma of being confronted with one candidate who doesn’t care about the Church and one candidate who positively hates her.”

      Personally, David, I think that is perhaps the best summation of the issue that I have read.

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    2. Ryan
      October 26, 2016

      Statistically speaking, the chance of your vote making any difference in the presidential election is negligible, even in swing states. In such a case, you might as well just vote for someone you actually agree with. Perhaps Mike Maturen.

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      1. David
        October 27, 2016

        That argument, applied consistently, seems to counsel against taking part in any kind of collective action. Why should I get my kids vaccinated, if I can just rely on everybody else getting their kids vaccinated? Why should I join a union and pay dues, if I can rely on everyone else joining and winning the gains that will collaterally benefit me? Why should I refrain from littering? The reason voting, vaccination, union membership, etc., “work” is because an individual is statistically insignificant, but a group is strong. (“Solidarity Forever,” anyone?)

        In the absence of a wider reform of our political system, I can’t shake the suspicion that third-party voting is a species of free riding. (That may be too strongly stated.) I mean, I’m all for Instant Runoff Voting or some comparable reform, but without that we really are going to be stuck choosing the “lesser evil.”

        Anyway, alas, Mike Maturen is not recognized as a write-in candidate where I live. Apparently that means that a vote for him would spoil my whole ballot.

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        1. Ryan
          October 27, 2016

          In other words, “If everybody thought that way…” But everybody doesn’t think that way. Social groups operate in a pretty deterministic fashion and the same sorts of people can be relied upon to vote mainstream parties every election. You are one person. The group is not going to shift because of your action. Your participation or non-participation will not effect a ripple in the political fabric. Presidential elections are not comparable to vaccinations, unionizing, etc because those are situations where a single weak link, or a few weak links, can spell disaster for the whole group. The chance of your single vote having that impact is negligible. So have fun with it. Or stay home. It really doesn’t matter.

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  3. Piers Forrester
    October 26, 2016

    I’m not American, but surely for those voting on 8 November it simply comes down to choosing the lesser evil? Can you support Trump as the lesser evil?

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  4. Ephemera XI | Opus Publicum
    October 28, 2016

    […] post, “Heaven Forbid,” along with “All Earthly Cares,” were not intended to signal a new direction for Opus Publicum, though I can understand how […]

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