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  1. Noah Moerbeek
    August 31, 2014

    I did not read the piece of work in question. However, if moral theology was approached in the same manner as what you have said Zmirak has said here we would be in deep trouble. If as individuals Catholic must use Catholic principles to govern his social and political life then it also stands to reason that as a community we must also strive to conform and to instruct and admonish one another when we depart from the Gospel.

    One could even argue that Catholic Social Teaching when practically applied falls into the realm of moral theology: which means that varying opinions should be categorized as : probable, equiprobable etc.

    To me the biggest humor is I don’t think anyone with substantial political power in the world gives a hoot what Catholic Social Teaching says, unless they can use it conforms to their own political objectives.

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    1. Steven Schloeder
      August 31, 2014

      >>One could even argue that Catholic Social Teaching when practically applied falls into the realm of moral theology:

      The Church herself makes the case: per the Compendium #72: “With significant allusions already being made in Laborem Exercens[100], a decisive clarification in this regard was made in the Encyclical Sollicitudo Rei Socialis: the Church’s social doctrine “belongs to the field, not of ideology, but of theology and particularly of moral theology”.

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      1. Noah Moerbeek
        August 31, 2014

        That’s great, thanks for citation.

        Reply
  2. Daniel Nichols
    September 1, 2014

    Much is made of the distinction between prudential judgement and binding doctrine. I understand that the Church has sometimes overstepped, and assumed that its gift of infallibility extended further than the very narrow limits of said authority. It does not mean infallible wisdom regarding merely human understanding of the natural law, which can change as our understanding of creation changes with the advent of new tools and deeper knowledge. Where it does apply is in interpreting Divine Revelation. As Catholic social teaching in fact is commentary on the implications of Christ’s clear commands in the Beatitudes and elsewhere it seems to me that it claims to at least near infallibility are pretty solid. To Mr Z and others, though, ‘economics’ is a human science, unrelated to the teachings of Christ. That is where their error lies.

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